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JONATHAN MONROE
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Professor of Comparative Literature and the department's spring 2014 acting Director of Graduate Studies, Jonathan Monroe is a member of the graduate fields of Comparative Literature, English, and Romance Studies. Recent and forthcoming publications include "Poetry, Philosophy, Parataxis"; "Composite Cultures, Chaos Wor(l)ds: Relational Poetics, Textual Hybridity, and the Future of Opacity"; "Autrement Dire: L'urgence de l'abstraction dans l'oeuvre de Rosmarie Waldrop"; "Los amores y juegos del joven Berger" (in Bolaño Salvaje); "Every Person, Many Studies"; and Demosthenes' Legacy, a book of prose poems and short fiction. Author of A Poverty of Objects: The Prose Poem and the Politics of Genre, and co-author and editor of Writing and Revising the Disciplines; Local Knowledges, Local Practices: Writing in the Disciplines at Cornell; Poetry Community, Movement (Diacritics); and Poetics of Avant-Garde Poetries (Poetics Today), he has published widely on modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, innovative poetries of the past two centuries, avant-garde movements and their contemporary legacies, writing and disciplinary practices, and interdisciplinary approaches in literary and cultural studies. His verse and prose poetry, short fiction, and cross-genre writing have appeared as well in numerous journals, including The American Poetry Review, Epoch, Harvard Review, /nor New Ohio Review, Verse, Volt, and Xcp: Cross-Cultural Poetics. A former DAAD and ACLS Fellow, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences, George Reed Professor of Writing and Rhetoric, and Director of the John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines, he has served as a steering committee member of Cornell's Institute for German Cultural Studies and as a member of the Fulbright selection committee for creative writing. His current research includes two book-length projects on contemporary poetry and poetics and postcolonial poetries and the poetics of relation.


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